Image Gallery: Inside the 2015 Yamaha YZF-R1

A closer look at Yamaha's all-new literbike

2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The 2015 YZF-R1 has an all-new Deltabox frame and magnesium subframe. The engine is a stressed member of the frame, and although the wheelbase of the new bike is 10mm shorter than the previous model, the ratio of swing arm length to wheebase remains the same at 40.5 percent to retain stability.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
Available as an option is a Communication Control Unit, which works with a GPS antenna and a rider's smartphone to make data available for download and analysis. Course mapping and automatic lap timing is available through the GPS data. Yamaha's Y-TRAC app works with smartphones and tablets, and the YRC app allows new settings to be uploaded for the R1's rider aids.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The 43mm KYB inverted fork has 4.7 inches of travel and is adjustable for preload, compression and rebound settings.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The new brake package consists of Nissin four-piston radial-mount calipers and 320mm discs, 10mm larger than the previous units. Brake lines are now braided stainless steel, and ABS with a Unified Braking System is standard equipment.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
In Race mode, the R1's TFT (Thin-File Transisor) LCD dash shows YRC settings, only the top range of the tachometer (from 8000 rpm on), a lap timer with best lap and last lap, and a larger gear position indicator.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
In Street mode the TFT dash shows fore/aft G-force and front brake pressure (the blue bar graphs on the right); the tachometer shows the full range and the gear position indicator is smaller.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The electronics package includes a six-axis IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) that measures pitch, roll, yaw in addition to acceleration in all three directions, 125 times per second. Rider aids include Power Delivery Mode, Traction Control System, Slide Control System, Lift Control System, Launch Control System and Quick Shift System. All systems are adjustable and together make up the Yamaha Ride Control package.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
As on the previous R1, the new model uses YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle, the company's ride-by-wire system) and YCC-I (Yamaha Chip Controlled Intake, with variable intake lengths). Power Delivery Mode (PWR) allows the rider to choose between four settings of throttle valve opening rate in relation to throttle grip position. The airbox is 19 percent larger than the old bike's, while the fuel tank is now made from aluminum and saves 3.5 pounds.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
All-new engine retains Yamaha's crossplane crankshaft and has magnesium engine covers. Bore and stroke are more oversquare at 79 x 50.9mm compared with 78 x 52.2mm for the previous model. Compression ratio is also slightly up, from 12.7:1 to 13.0:1.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
Adjustments are made to the YRC package on the left handlebar using this mode switch and up/down toggle. The Lift Control System (LIF) detects front-to-rear pitch rate via the IMU, and has three settings (plus off).
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
Access to the various menus on the TFT display are made via this roller switch on the right handlebar. Front brake master cylinder is a Nissin unit. The Launch Control System (LCS) limits revs to 10,000 rpm and works with the TCS and LIF systems for maximum acceleration. This system has two settings plus off.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The rear shock is a KYB unit and adjustable for preload, rebound damping, and high- and low-speed compression damping. The linkage is updated with a pivot position that is "optimally placed to provide exceptional handling, and excellent transmission of engine torque to the track surface."
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
New wheels are cast magnesium and together save 1.9 pounds over the previous model.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The R1's Unified Braking System (UBS) activates the rear brake when the front brake is applied. UBS and the bike's ABS take into account lean angle and attitude, and vary force distribution between the front and rear brakes accordingly.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
Yamaha's Traction Control System (TCS) takes into account lean angle as well as speed differential between the front and rear wheels, and can be adjusted to one of 9 settings or turned off. Slide Control System (SCS) works through the bike's IMU and will control power when a slide during acceleration/leaning conditions is detected; there are three settings plus it can be turned off.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The Quick Shift System (QSS) cuts engine power during upshifts so the clutch does not have to be used and the throttle can be held open; there are two settings, plus off.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
Intake and exhaust valves are larger than previously, at 33mm and 26.5mm respectively. The valves are operated through small rocker arms rather than directly, which allows more aggressive actuation.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
The R1's transmission has stacked shafts as before, while the clutch is a slip/assist unit.
The cylinders are offset 2mm forward of the crank centerline to reduce thrust force and friction. The connecting rods are made from a titanium alloy that is 60 percent lighter than steel, and are manufactured using fracture-split technology (the rod is made as a single piece and then split into two at the main bearing, rather than being machined in two pieces), a first for a production motorcycle.
2015 Yamaha YZF-R1
All-new exhaust system has titanium headers and muffler canister; the "mid-ship layout" helps to centralize mass compared with the previous model's underseat system.

Yamaha's 2015 YZF-R1 is all-new from the ground up, and features many new technical innovations. Here, we take a closer look at the bike via images Yamaha has released showing various aspects of the new bike and engine. Scroll through the gallery above to see them and learn more about the new R1 and its innovative new tech.

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