Tucked tight hugging the 2017 Triumph Street Triple RS matt silver fuel tank with throttle pinned the entire length of Circuito Catalunya's long pit straight, I click up for a seamless gear change into fifth followed shortly with another on-cue snick into top gear. Aided by a quickshifter and the high-resolution TFT dash display's blue bar graph tachometer that cleverly changes color over the final 1000 rpm of the rev range; which first turns orange, then red, and ultimately flashing as the engine approaches its 12,500 rpm limit. The windblast over the stubby fly screen is remarkably fluid and the rock steady chassis is unlike any naked sportbike I've ridden to date.

The digital speedometer reads 150 mph for a mere instant prior to sitting up and applying a firm two finger squeeze on the brake lever. Dropping down three gears for Turn One, the chassis maintains steadfast composure under hard braking with a slight periodic kickback felt through the lever as the ABS effectively keeps the rear wheel from lifting off the ground.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS rear view track action
The RS represents the top tier of the all-new trio of Street Triple models offering more power and higher-spec suspension than its siblings.Courtesy of Triumph

An assertive side-to-side flick from full right lean to decking the left peg through the following apex offers an impressive testament to the sporting qualities of Triumph's latest Street Triple platform. Carving a tight line through the fast fourth gear sweeper that follows doesn't faze the bike a bit with nary a wag or wiggle through its wide taper-style handlebar. I also experience little drama feeding in throttle for aggressive drive out of the track's quartet of second gear exits. The bike's ride-by-wire based traction and wheelie control have quickly gained my full trust.

All this track-bred agility and confidence bolstering stability comes without need for a steering damper or an appointment with the chiropractor following a feverish day in the saddle.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS on the winding track
This S section of the Catalunya infield was taken in 3rd gear aboard 2017 Triumph Street Triple RS. Easy work thanks to a sharp handling chassis and good leverage through the taper-style one-piece handlebar.Courtesy of Triumph

As the top tier of Triumph’s all-new third generation Street Triple lineup, the RS is blessed with more peak engine performance and higher spec suspension, brakes and tires than its S and R siblings. While all three models share the new 765cc liquid-cooled, inline-three cylinder engine (essentially the Daytona 675R powertrain endowed with a larger bore and stroke), model specific cam profile and timing specs lend each version its own unique state of tune. The RS’s claimed 123 horsepower (121 HP U.S. version) is said to represent a 16-percent gain over its immediate predecessor and while it offers 5 more peak ponies than the new R model, the latter enjoys a slight torque advantage throughout low-to-midrange revs. Adding to the boost in output is a 4.4-pound weight reduction furthering Triumph’s “lightest in class” claim.

Our day aboard the Street Triple RS began with a morning road ride on mountain roads and highways north of Barcelona, Spain offering a taste of the Street Triple’s street prowess prior to riding the circuit. The bottom two gears now have shorter ratios than the previous Street Triple offering easier pull away from stops and greater acceleration. The R and RS both have a slipper/assist clutch providing light effort with good engagement feel. The counter-balanced engine provided smooth operation with a silky quality across much of the rev range.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS straightaway track action
Is that paint slick? Wouldn't want to be the poor sap to find out. Putting the Street Triple RS on a precise line lap after lap came natural.Courtesy of Triumph

Selectable ride modes, each with factory tailored throttle response, TC and ABS sensitivity settings are an important part of the new package. The S model offers Rain and Road modes while the R adds Sport and a “Rider” mode that allows custom selection of the parameters found within the various preset modes. The RS has all this, plus an additional Track mode that shares the same throttle response as Sport but allows more rear slip under acceleration and a higher ABS threshold. It’s worth noting that all modes provide full peak power output and switching in/out of Track or Rider mode can only be done while the bike is at a standstill. TC and wheelie control are not independent of the other but can be turned off.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS on the sweeping curve
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph

I sampled each mode during our three-hour open track session. While Rain mode saw the TC light flashing frequently exiting nearly every corner and softened throttle response a fair degree, I found it offers an intuitive connection between throttle and rear tire with a much less intrusive and delayed nature often found with “rain” mode strategies. Road is better yet and offers a great choice to alleviate head butting with a passenger on back. Initiating TC intervention in either Sport or Track mode required a determined handful of throttle at lean thanks to this triple’s linear delivery and tractable nature. The biggest difference I experienced between these two modes while hot lapping the circuit came under hard braking. What I had initially thought was a form of brake fade, in fact was Sport mode’s ABS anti rear lift feature at play. It cycles so smoothly that once initiated, squeezing ever harder on the lever maintained the same rate of deceleration without a grab/release effect. Track mode truly was the cat’s meow and places more control in the rider’s right paw.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS close-up track action
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph

On the highway headed back to our hotel I toggled the dash presentation to a preferred style of the six available layouts and switched on its accessory heated grips. Having just spent the past few hours ripping around a circuit in fast company riding with the likes of former World Superbike champion Carl Fogarty, 2016 Isle of Man Supersport winner Gary Johnson and Triumph’s development duo of David and Felipe Lopez, it struck me that I had just experienced the ultimate track day aboard one of the best bikes I could imagine riding to, on and from a track. And more to the point, my old bones felt fresh and ready for more.

Triumph’s third generation Street Triple truly is a track day delight and a great everyday ride to boot.

2017 Triumph Street Triple RS front profile action
Even in a full tuck the stubby fly screen of the Triumph Street Triple RS provides a clear view of the road ahead.Courtesy of Triumph

US Pricing:

S model: $9,900
R model: $11,200
RS model: $12,500

SPECIFICATIONS
Engine type Liquid-cooled, DOHC inline 3
Displacement 765cc
Seat height 32 in.
Fuel capacity 4.6 gal.
Claimed weight 366 lb. (dry)
Base price $12,500
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS, R, and S​ models
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS, R, and S​ models (left to right) offers 3 engine tunes, all with more power and torque than the previous generation - Street Triple S with up to 6.6% more and 111.5 Hp peak power @ 11,250 rpm - Street Triple R with up to 11.3% more and116.4 Hp peak power @ 12,000 rpm - Street Triple RS with up to 16% more and 121 Hp peak power @ 11,750 rpm Linked to the ride-by-wire system all models have new riding modes, which adjust throttle response, ABS and traction control settings - Street Triple S featuring 2 riding modes: Road and Rain. - Street Triple R featuring 4 riding modes: Road, Rain, Sport and Rider Programmable. - Street Triple RS featuring 5 modes: Road, Rain, Sport, Rider Programmable and Track.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS static side view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS static rear 3/4 view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS static 3/4 view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS static 3/4 view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS front brake details
The Street Triple RS features Brembo M50 4-piston radial monobloc calipers on the front. The race-spec units combine with a top-shelf Brembo radial master-cylinder offering adjustable lever position and leverage ratio deliver exceptional stopping power and feel.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS right grip details
Home button located below the start/kill rocker switch of the 2017 Triumph Street Triple RS is one of a trio of HOTAS (hands on throttle and stick) controls present on the new machine.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS cockpit view
To navigate the new instruments on the Street Triple R and RS there is an all-new switch cubes with an intuitive 5-way joystick control that have been ergonomically optimized to be easy to use. The Street Triple S features the revised switch cubes set-up from the latest generation Speed Triple. ABS is switchable on the Street Triple R and RS through the ‘rider programmable’ riding mode, which can be adjusted (with road and track ABS settings) or can be turned off completely if desired.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS TFT dash details
This is a view of the dash menu that can be accessed while the bike is stationary. The first item we switched was changing displayed units from metric to U.S. giving a good 'ol mph readout. The quickshifter can be enabled/disabled, the turn signals can be set to auto or manual cancel, Rider mode parameters can be altered and the rpm in which shift warning light functions can be changed to name a few of the various functions available.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS TFT dash details
The Street Triple R and RS feature all-new, angle adjustable TFT instruments (for different rider height preference.) There are three different screen display styles to choose from, pre-set to the riding modes and changeable easily on the move. To ensure that the screen is readable in all weather and light conditions, each of the three styles can be selected with ‘High’ or ’Auto’ contrast. The Street Triple RS comes with an additional set of 3 more screen display styles. The second set presenting a more dynamic display theme and includes a lap timer that is exclusive to the ‘RS’. The Street Triple S has a fully revised LCD instrument pack, as featured on the latest generation Speed Triple. This allows the rider to select the riding modes, on the move or at a standstill, and access key information from the on-board computer, including odometer, fuel gauge, trip meter and journey distance.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS TFT dash details
This was Canet's preferred display style of the six available on the RS modelCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS rear suspension details
The Street Triple RS comes with the highest-specification Showa big piston 41mm front fork, adjustable for preload, rebound and compression damping. The rear suspension unit is a premium Öhlins STX40 piggyback reservoir monoshock offering spring preload, rebound and compression damping as well.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS engine details
Developed from the race bred ‘Daytona’ engine, the new 765cc Street Triple engine delivers a step up in power and torque. With more than 80 new parts including new crank, pistons and Nikasil plated aluminum barrels (replacing the predecessor's sleeve liners) has allowed an increased bore and stroke while retaining the same outer engine dimensions. The result is a significant advance in performance, particularly low-down and in the mid-range.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS seat details
The Street Triple saddle proved well padded, roomy and supportive for a long day's ride. A passenger pillion replaces this solo cover should you feel an accommodating need. There's also enough storage room beneath solo cowl for Canet to stow a waded up rain coat during the street ride.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS taillight details
Now that's one sexy rear...I don't care who you are.Courtesy of Triumph
Don Canet and Felipe Lopez
Don Canet and Triumph Lead Tester Felipe Lopez discussing the finer points of the Street Triple's chassis and handling.Courtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS studio 3/4 view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS studio front view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph
2017 Triumph Street Triple RS studio side view
2017 Triumph Street Triple RSCourtesy of Triumph

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