Superbikes With Soul: Classic vs. Modern Superbike Comparison Test

Fast Freddie Spencer tests the greatest superbikes old and new.

As Freddie Spencer climbed to the top step of the 1982 Daytona Superbike podium, he knew he was done racing Superbikes. His first year in Grand Prix loomed before him, and he had already tasted Formula 1 perfection aboard the Honda FWS1000. ?He knew what a good racebike should feel like and the CB900F-based Superbike wasn't it.

“It was a handful,” Freddie reflects. “In this corner, it would move around in about six different directions before you could turn it. In that corner, it would move in eight! It was never settled, never calm. I won Daytona on it in ’82 and told Honda I was done with Superbikes.”

At this point, historians are scratching their heads and wondering, "So how did he win Daytona Superbike in '83, '84 and '85?"

“Because in the fall of ’82, I tested the prototype 750 Interceptor at Daytona. I was almost three seconds a lap faster than on the old CB and that was after about six laps! I told Honda I wanted to race Daytona. By March, the bike was really good.”

Honda admits the 1983 750 Interceptor was the first production bike built with racing in mind, but Big Red wasn't alone: Suzuki's '83 GS750 and Kawasaki's '83 GPz750 bristled with race-inspired bits, and suddenly, all of us on Katana 1000s and GPz1100s and XS1100s found our-selves on heavy, wobbly streetbikes. I know because I was 21 years old and even my modded Kat couldn't turn and rev like the shiny red Interceptor my buddy Don Debusk bought.

Freddie Spencer leads the charge at Chuckwalla
Freddie Spencer leads the charge at ChuckwallaJeff Allen

A 21-year-old street rider in Salt Lake City had just realized what a 21-year-old racer in Daytona knew: The Superbike class that was born in America in 1976 had just become Priority Number One for the Japanese factories.

Those two kids' lives have been massively affected by street-legal superbikes, and we found ourselves at the age of 51 in the paddock of Chuckwalla Valley Raceway surrounded by six of the most significant Superbikes in history: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition, 1990 Honda RC30, 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01, 1992 Ducati 888 SP4S, 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R and a 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-02.

Spencer had raced and won on a Two Brothers RC30 in 1991, competing against the OW-01, ZX-7R and 888, but he'd never had a chance to ride any of these other machines. Spencer enjoys motorcycle history and could relate each bike to a rider, guys like Raymond Roche, Kevin Schwantz, Scott Russell, Doug Polen, Doug Chandler, Troy Corser and Thomas Stevens—champions all. Our job was to lap Chuckwalla on these six jewels and compare notes, while benchmarking them against two of the best modern sportbikes available today: the Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and a Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition. And if you know Freddie Spencer, you know he wasn't going to just cruise around.

Freddie Spencer and Nick Ienatsch

Freddie Spencer with the author

Freddie Spencer and Nick Ienatsch.Jeff Allen
1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition and 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition and 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition

The ’86 Suzuki Limited Edition launched a GSX-R750 dynasty that pushed every other maker out of the 3/4-liter sportbike market, rivaling Yamaha’s TZ750 in its ability to dominate a racing category. This first version never won a Superbike championship, but literally took over the club-racing scene and put one Doug Polen on the map. The new Yoshimura Limited 750 wears tricks and treats from the tuning shop that makes a stellar bike even better while special paint and carbon bits set it apart from the crowd.Jeff Allen

26 Years of Development: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition and 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition

In 1986, the first “homologation special” arrived on our shores in the form of Suzuki’s GSX-R750 Limited Edition. Suzuki knew what it wanted to race and created the Limited. To meet the rules, a certain number of bikes had to be sold to the public to “homologate” a particular model, and Suzuki wanted a dry clutch, beefier fork and a tricker, lighter weapon than the standard 750 introduced in Europe in ’85. I first saw the Limited at Laguna Seca during the GSX-R750 press launch, and it will forever be equated with Kevin Schwantz, who was also in attendance. It’s fair to say the focus on superbike weight savings began with this GSX-R, and each of these five other bikes followed in its footsteps.

This bike, owned by Dave Waugh, is no garage queen, with 36mm Mikuni flatslide carbs and a Yosh pipe, and tuning by Matsu, that company's long-time engine builder. You sit on a modern sportbike but in the Limited, the low seat making the reach to the clip-ons extremely comfortable. The bubble surrounds you with the fuel tank between your elbows, and it's an amazingly placid place to spend a few laps. One of the extras on the Limited was a steering damper, but this bike's stability on 18-inch rims makes that part superfluous. The bike soaked up CVR's bumps, and we were both impressed far beyond?expectations.

The three-time GP world champ settled into the older Suzuki and gave the throttle a quick blip, enjoying the rattle of the dry clutch. He knew the Bridgestone Battlax GT tires were designed more for sport-touring than the racetrack, but by the second lap, he was hauling ass by letting the bike turn a bit longer into the corner so he could take away lean angle earlier on the exit. I had the perfect view from the perch of the 2012 model as I watched Freddie carve some shockingly quick laps. When you’re on the wrong tires, it helps to be the smoothest rider in the world.

SPECIFICATIONS 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition
Price new $6499 $15,530
Engine type dohc 16-valve Inline-Four dohc 16-valve Inline-Four
Displacement 749cc 749cc
Bore x stroke 70.0 x 48.7mm 70.0 x 48.7mm
Dry weight 426 lb. 404 lb.
1/4-mile 11.10 sec @ 121.45 mph 10.26 sec @ 137.77 mph*
Top speed 139 mph 169 mph*
*performance figures from 2011 Suzuki GSX-R750

We both love how narrow this bike feels, and Suzuki’s focus on reducing mass can be felt in every move the bike makes. It is unique in this group due to the seating position, but the bike’s ability to change its line anywhere in the corner really impressed Spencer. “A manufacturer will often have similarities between models,” Spencer said, “and I used to be amazed at how well Wes Cooley could turn his Suzuki GS1000, even on used tires. I feel that same thing with this bike. I know they’re different models, but the way this steers reminds me of watching Cooley late in the race.”

The ’86 rode on the most-narrow rubber (110/70-18 front, 140/60-18 rear) and that sparked a discussion because it was Spencer who led the development of Michelin radial tires, while Kenny Roberts and Eddie Lawson spearheaded that race for Dunlop. When Spencer and Michelin finally got it right, three seconds dropped off the lap time at places like Spa and Hockenheim! Those were heady times and each of us reaps the benefits every time we ride a modern bike.

Before we jump on the RC30 and ZX-7R, a quick note about the 2012 Yosh Limited Edition: absolutely marvelous and a joy to ride. Hard to fault and fun to explore. What it lacks in soul it makes up for in precision. Riding these two back-to-back left no doubt that Suzuki’s commitment to the 750 is as strong as it was at Laguna Seca in 1986.

Freddie and Nick compare notes

Freddie and Nick compare notes

There were huge differences between the two Suzukis, most notably in feel. The modern bike was like a chunk of billet titanium, so solid and planted. The ’86 had a more willowy feel, but was super light on its feet and seemingly wrapped around the rider to offer constant communication.Jeff Allen
1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R and 1990 Honda RC30

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R and 1990 Honda RC30

Spencer finally had a chance to ride what Doug Chandler and Scott Russell took to national and World Superbike championships... and he liked it. The ZX-7R appeared the most pedestrian of these homologation bikes but beneath the fake number plates and basic paint were goods that Rob Muzzy fashioned into missiles. Just ask Carl Fogarty.Jeff Allen

Revisiting the War: 1990 Honda RC30 and 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R

I witnessed Spencer's first lap aboard the immaculate RC30 (owned by Grant Hellinger of Sea & Ski Marine in Costa Mesa, California) from the seat of Scott Russell's favorite race bike, the ZX-7R, owned by Chris Redpath. The history of these two bikes and these two racers could fill a magazine. Spencer is Russell's racing idol, and the Georgian would study videotape of the three-time world champion and then try to emulate that style on empty backroads. Russell's rise through the ranks includes standing on the Topeka AMA podium and looking over to see his hero next to him. "I just couldn't believe I was standing next to Freddie Spencer," Russell recalled.

In race form, these two bikes gave one another fits. In stock form, too, as Spencer and I discovered. The RC30’s tight seating position holds the rider forward against the tank and Spencer talked about the evolution of ride heights during this time. “We were still running the bikes pretty flat, and keeping the rider forward helped weight the front. The biggest problem with this bike was how it spun its rear. Once it started spinning, it was hard to modulate. It just wanted to keep spinning.”

The RC turns magically and feels small, compact, eager—very special and a little growly as the V-Four does its magic. It works like you expect a Honda would, but there is so much soul to the sound and feel, reminding riders and witnesses that this is one of HRC’s most successful products. Just ask Miguel Duhamel or two-time world champion Fred Merkel—just two of the dozens of riders who made history aboard Honda’s third-gen V-Four. Randy Renfrow won his only Superbike national aboard an RC30.

SPECIFICATIONS 1990 Honda RC30 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R
Price new $14,998 $8999
Engine type dohc 16-valve V-Four dohc 16-valve Inline-Four
Displacement 748cc 749cc
Bore x stroke 70.0 x 48.6mm 71.0 x 47.3mm
Dry weight 449 lb. 460 lb.
1/4-mile 12.07 sec @ 124.13 mph 10.82 sec @ 129.68 mph
Top speed 153 mph 152 mph

On paper and in person, the ZX-7R can’t muster the flash and interest of the RC30, but don’t confuse pedigree with lap times. Kawasaki slipped a close-ratio transmission and 39mm Keihin flat-slide carburetors into the R model to give Rob Muzzy and his riders Doug Chandler and Russell an impressive first step toward national and world domination. Russell ruled the world in ’93, and both he and Chandler captured national titles on?this model.

Spencer and I loved the way this bike steered, how balanced it was, how light it felt in transition. This ZX-7R combined light and tactile steering with amazing stability, truly defining “balance” in a motorcycle. We could really relax at the handlebars and let the Bridgestones bite into the pavement. This wasn’t a flicky, short and frisky motorcycle, but a composed bump-gobbling platform that felt wide and solid between the knees and surprised you with its ease at turn-in.

The tall first gear and awkward low-speed fueling I remembered from long ago was a non-issue once we rolled out of the pits. And, as with the Honda, the close-ratio tranny shifted beautifully, but the brakes on this particular Kawi were dangerously wooden and completely lacked any bite. “Reminds me of the brakes early in my GP career,” commented Spencer. “We could get either great feel or long life.” Redpath suspects a problem with the master cylinder. ?Too bad, because if the brakes were on par with the rest of the bike, this thing would be a weapon.

Trading back and forth on these two bikes brought to mind the final AMA round of the 1991 season in Miami. Spencer won the street-circuit race, and Russell remembers it clearly because the Honda’s win took points away from him and helped crown Thomas Stevens as the national champion on his Vance & Hines OW-01. “Freddie was on fire that day,” Russell recalled. “He’d run that thing in there, push the front, pick up the throttle and spin it off the corner. Thomas and I had nothin’ for him.”

1990 Honda RC30

1990 Honda RC30

Spencer’s Rothmans-look leathers from Alpinestars provided a time-warp moment. Honda’s RVF racer contributed so much to the third-gen Honda V-Four, details like the swing-away front axle clamps, single-sided swingarm and minimal instrumentation. The previous Honda V-Four was ridden to AMA championships by Wayne Rainey and Bubba Shobert. All that info went into the RC30, the bike that Fred Merkel raced to the 1988 World Superbike Championship.Jeff Allen
1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

The contrast in these two bikes makes it difficult to sense a family connection. The OW-01 seems TZ750-ish in its riding position and geometry. In other words, a bit old-fashioned, stretched out. Yamaha claims to have taken the chassis geometry and layout from its 500cc Grand Prix bike as the basis for the 1999 OW-02, and then added in a Genesis engine that could produce 130 horsepower when uncorked. Yeah, that works!Jeff Allen

Ten Years of Cutting-Edge Yamahas: 1989 OW-01 and 1999 OW-02 YZF-R7

For the clearest picture of how far sportbikes advanced in the 1990s, you need to ride these two bikes back-to-back, just as Spencer and I were able to do, thanks to owner (and real-live Hollywood stuntman), Tom McComas. The FZR750RR OW-01 rivals the RC30 in trick-parts-per-inch and traces its roots back to world-level endurance racing just like the Honda, but the feel of the two bikes is decidedly different. As with the ZX-7R, the carburetion on the OW-01 would benefit from a bit of fiddling as each bike could have been optimized with a few quick and easy changes. The 01 surged in the top revs, and I know from experience that this motor can be jetted to pull harder and longer.

The OW-01 has that old-school riding position that purists simply love. The seat is relatively low and so are the clip-ons, with the bubble almost completely engulfing the rider and the footpegs way up high. Those short clip-ons give the bike a hefty steering feel, and again, we find amazing stability and equanimity over the bumps. The bike comes from the factory with an Öhlins damper (with remotely adjustable spring preload!) and a Showa fork, and it was shocking how quickly this bike could be hustled over the bumps. We dialed in all the rear spring we could and would have loved to mess with ride height to lighten the steering, especially after getting off the OW-02, or R7, as it is commonly known.

SPECIFICATIONS 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-02
Price new $16,000 $32,000
Engine type dohc 20-valve Inline-Four dohc 20-valve Inline-Four
Displacement 749cc 749cc
Bore x stroke 72.0 x 46.0mm 72.0 x 46.0mm
Dry weight 445 lb. 416 lb.
1/4-mile 11.20 sec @ 130.81 mph 10.93 sec @ 133.20 mph
Top speed 160 mph 163 mph

“We just moved into the modern age,” Spencer remarked after his first three laps on the R7. “This is the first bike that needs a steering damper. It’s also the first bike that is starting to feel fast.” Have you noticed that outright power hasn’t really been mentioned yet? These bikes simply didn’t wow us with their straight-line acceleration, and tests from the day put them through the quarter-mile at speeds around 130 mph. Relatively heavy flywheels are apparent in how slowly these bikes gain rpm, especially the OW-01 and ZX-7R. For comparison, a 2012 GSX-R750 hits 136 mph in the quarter-mile and revs so much more quickly and willingly. And keep in mind that these bikes are 20 years old with tired valve springs and unknown tuning histories. The Ducati SP4S is the only motor that perked up our jaded brains!

The R7, while beautifully sleek in design, appears a bit pedestrian at first glance when compared to the RC and OW-01. The R7 uses stickers where the other two are painted, and there’s a subtlety to it that makes it blend into the crowd—until you ride it. This bike, along with the 888, is fuel-injected and the stumbles and foibles and warm-up of the other older bikes simply aren’t present here. It feels modern in its steering, and we both felt comfortable pushing it hard because there were no reminders of its age. Yamaha did its best to replicate Wayne Rainey’s YZR500 GP chassis, added Öhlins suspension bits and a slipper clutch—all this back in 1999. It feels short, light and strong. No wonder Noriyuki Haga loved it.

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2.Jeff Allen
1992 Ducati 888 SP4S and 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S and 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R

Ducati produced a true racebike with lights, the SP4S (shown next to the ZX-7R), which provided the raw thrills of a racebike around Chuckwalla. There are few similarities between RSV4 and 888 SP4S aside from their end-of-season number.Jeff Allen

Italy's World Champions: 1992 Ducati 888 SP4S and 2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE

"That's one of the best bikes I've ever ridden," stated Spencer as we pried him off the Aprilia. "Hey, Don , show me how to reduce the traction control; it's holding this thing back on the exits." Really? Road Test Editor Canet came over and fiddled around with the dash and all those buttons, and Spencer went out again. Now, the bike would spin and wheelie. Freddie felt right at home.

“This thing feels like an inline-Four the way it makes power,” said Spencer, “but it has the throttle-to-rear-tire communication that I love on the RC30. It’s the way these V-Fours make power that let’s you really feel rear grip. I definitely feel a tie between this Aprilia and the RC30.” Spencer and I both loved the compact feel of this Aprilia, and it’s uncanny how both these V-Four machines feel smaller than their inline-Four or V-Twin competition, regardless of era.

Balz Renggli of Moto Forza in Escondido, California, provided us with a rare 1992 Ducati 888 SP4S, the model Doug Polen won the 1991 and ’92 World Superbike championships on. After the first two corners of Chuckwalla’s fun layout, we knew why. The power is right there, right now, and the brake feel is outstanding. Just as we started to really hustle the bike, the worn Bridgestones let us know the limits were quite low. I pushed the front pretty good and Spencer tucked it completely, showing me the scuff on the knees of his leathers. “Even with the carbon tank, this bike feels pretty tall and really loads the front, so having that old tire on the front is probably the worst combination,” Spencer commented. With better front grip, this Duc would have been a joy on the racetrack.

SPECIFICATIONS 1992 Ducati 888 SP4S 2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE
Price new $21,000 $19,999
Engine type dohc 8-valve V-Twin dohc 16-valve V-Four
Displacement 888cc 1000cc
Bore x stroke 94.0 x 64.0mm 78.0 x 52.3mm
Dry weight 408 lb. 437 lb.
1/4-mile 10.84 sec @ 128.20 mph 9.98 sec @ 143.62 mph*
Top speed 147 mph 178 mph*
*performance figures from 2012 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC

The riding position wouldn’t be much fun on the street for old wrists, but none of these bikes were designed with the street as a priority. That’s why some of the original tests on these bikes were less than enthusiastic. Back then, I remember trolling along the 405 Freeway and looking like a bobble-head doll even though the ZX-7R’s front compression was at its lightest setting. It was pretty miserable leaving a light, too. The RC30 ran super-hot in traffic, scorching the rider’s inner thighs. The Limited’s dry clutch was prone to grabbiness. After circulating Chuckwalla, I realized that the manufacturers should have only let us ride these homologation specials at a track and in back-to-back comparisons with their plebeian siblings.

The SP4S is close-coupled, like the RC, putting the rider up against the tank, and that single attribute dates the bike more than anything. Modern bikes give the rider so much more room to scoot around, but the 888 and RC (and OW-01 to a lesser extent) had designers who wanted the rider's weight right here. Of all the older bikes, the Duc runs the hardest and owner Renggli told us the entire bike was refurbished by the same Japanese performance shop that fettled Haga's Ducatis. The bike feels sharp and fast, pulling off the corner with an immediacy no other older bike could match and delivering a solid top-end hit due to the race-kit cams and high-compression pistons. Shame about the tires.

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and 2012 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura LE

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and 2012 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura LE

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and 2012 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura LE.Jeff Allen
Don Canet, Nick Ienatsch, and Freddie Spencer

CW

Three 51-year-olds smitten by Superbikes: Don Canet, Nick Ienatsch and Freddie Spencer. Freddie had just related a bit of advice his father had given him. “My dad never said much. He was too busy wrenching on my bikes. But one day I was off the pace and he watched me in practice. I came in and wondered out loud why I was going so slowly. He said, ‘Well, you never want to be too comfortable out there.’”Jeff Allen

Freddie Reflects

Freddie Spencer knew going into Chuckwalla how good these bikes would be. I did not, and frankly, expected much less. “Bike development has always been a balance,” the champ said. “You get more power and that means better brakes are needed. If you gain some lean angle, you need grippier tires. If tire grip improves, a more-rigid chassis is next. By ’83, the factories were paying attention to this balance and every year got better because they kept fixing things at the design level. These six bikes were the best of their particular model, and remember, I raced against all these bikes except the R7. I saw how fast they could go.”

Despite the rarity and value of each bike, Freddie and I were free to run as many laps as we needed. The true value of these soul-filled Superbikes can be felt only while in motion, and that ties into the pilot, too. I worked for Spencer at his riding school for 12 years, and our best times were aboard bikes, circulating a racetrack at speed. At Chuckwalla, I rode six seminal homologation Super-bikes that set the standard for their time with the rider who spearheaded the development of the modern sportbike. Thanks, champ.

PHOTO GALLERY:

Superbikes With Soul - the line-up

Superbikes With Soul - the line-up

Freddie Spencer with the author

Freddie Spencer with the author

Freddie Spencer leads the charge at Chuckwalla

Freddie Spencer leads the charge at Chuckwalla

Superbikes With Soul - on the starting block

Superbikes With Soul - on the starting block

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition and 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition and 2012 GSX-R750 Yoshimura Limited Edition

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - 36mm Mikuni flatslide carbs

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - 36mm Mikuni flatslide carbs

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - Yoshimura pipe

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - Yoshimura pipe

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - headlights

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition - headlights

Freddie and Nick compare notes

Freddie and Nick compare notes

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R and 1990 Honda RC30

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R and 1990 Honda RC30

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - nameplate

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - nameplate

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - headlights

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - headlights

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - tailsection

1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R - tailsection

Freddie Spencer aboard the ZX-7R

Freddie Spencer aboard the ZX-7R

1990 Honda RC30

1990 Honda RC30

1990 Honda RC30 - single-sided swingarm

1990 Honda RC30 - single-sided swingarm

1990 Honda RC30 - swing-away front axle clamps

1990 Honda RC30 - swing-away front axle clamps

1990 Honda RC30 - minimal instrumentation

1990 Honda RC30 - minimal instrumentation

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 and 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 - headlights

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 - headlights

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 - exhaust pipe

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01 - exhaust pipe

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW-01

1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2 - Öhlins suspension

1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2 - Öhlins suspension

1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2 - tailsection/exhaust pipe

1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-2 - tailsection/exhaust pipe

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S and 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S and 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S - exhaust system

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S - exhaust system

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S - tailsection close-up

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S - tailsection close-up

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S

1992 Ducati 888 SP4S

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and 2012 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura LE

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC SE and 2012 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura LE

Freddie Spencer leathers

Freddie Spencer leathers

CW's Don Canet, Nick Ienatsch and Freddie Spencer

CW's Don Canet, Nick Ienatsch and Freddie Spencer

Freddie Spencer's lid

Freddie Spencer's lid

Superbikes With Soul - group shot

Superbikes With Soul - group shot