The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb is America's second oldest road race. Held outside of Colorado Springs, Colorado, it consists of a 12.42-mile course that climbs through 156 turns to an elevation of 14,115 feet.

To make it to the top without flying off of one of its sheer cliffs in under 11 minutes is to be one of the best in the world. To do it in under ten? That requires a special mix of superhero and insanity and only a select few mad men have achieved that feat. Five guys, to be exact. Carlin Dunne was the first to get up the hill under the ten-minute mark in 2012 aboard a Ducati Multistrada 1200 S with a record setting time of 9:52.819. Greg Tracy also made it up in under 10 minutes in 2012, with a time of 9:58.164. Jeremy Toye did it in 2014, and then the barrier stood for 2015 and 2016.

That barrier and Carlin's record stood until this year. Until a man named Chris Fillmore.

Chris Fillmore Pikes Peak
Chris Fillmore racing up Pikes Peak.Larry Chen

Chris has bounced all over the motorcycle world. He's raced supermotos and superbikes, most recently the MotoAmerica Superbikes racing series. His day job has him wearing the title of "KTM North America Media Relations," but with a solid history of racing KTMs, he's a lot more than that to the Austrian brand (they sent him to Barber to race an RC390, TKM 450 SX-F in supermoto trim, and Super Duke 1290 R).

This year, Chris joined Cycle News editor Rennie Scaysbrook on the KTM factory effort to take on the mountain.

KTM did an incredible job capturing both the preparation for the race and Chris's run. If you pay attention, you'll see as the environment, pavement, and traction levels change as well as just how bumpy the top of the course has gotten. The soundtrack and ticking of the clock adds to the suspense, so I'll let them take the story from here.

Chris Fillmore Pikes Peak
Chris Fillmore racing up Pikes Peak.Larry Chen
Chris Fillmore Pikes Peak
Chris Fillmore racing up Pikes Peak.Larry Chen