Ralph Hermens

Analog Motorcycles Will Be Showing Two Ducks And A Duke At The 2018 Quail Motorcycle Gathering

How will Tony Prust top his 2015 award-winning debut?

Since Analog Motorcycle's 1949 Indian Continental Scout took first place in the Custom/Modified class at the 2015 Quail Motorcycle Gathering, owner Tony Prust has been busy. And he wanted to return with a bike that topped that award winner, while including a couple of other bikes to show his range. With two Ducatis and a KTM about to grace the green at the Quail Lodge on Saturday, I spoke with Prust and asked him to walk me through what he's bringing from his shop in Waukegan, Illinois.

ducati
Top Left: Born from a 2007 KTM 990 Super Duke. Bottom Left: Born from a 1950 Ducati 50. Right: Analog Motorcycles owner/builder Tony Prust and his Analog Ducati Moto3.Grant Schwingle, Analog Motorcycles

Analog Archduke • 2007 KTM 990 Super Duke

Owner: Andrew Lux

The Backstory
I've been a big KTM fan for several years. I've owned a number of them and they never disappoint. I've always wanted to build a custom KTM but never had the opportunity, given most of my customers haven't requested one as a donor bike or it wouldn't fit the design request. Granted, I could have probably customized one I've owned but I usually keep them somewhat unmolested and just focus on riding them as much as possible.

I owned an ’07 990 Super Duke very similar to what this one started out as. Bought it used with 7,000 miles on it in ’09 and fell in love. I made luggage brackets for it and racked up 20,000 miles on it over the next five or six years. I rode it on several long-distance trips and around town; it was my daily rider. Perfect seating position, great handing, and plenty of power. Not a problem to put 400–500 miles a day on a trip, and when you get to the twisties it really performed. I sold my 990 and picked up a 1290 Super Duke and that thing is a riot. So much power and so usable.

ktm superduke sideview
The Analog Super Duke, based on Prust’s favorite daily rider.Analog Motorcycles

I’ve been slowly learning the art of metal shaping as time allows. We’ve built several customs over the years and I’ve had to farm out some or all of the metal shaping, depending on how involved it was, to make sure the vision I wanted to achieve was met. I’ve steadily learned from various people and have taken a class or two, had a mentor coming into the shop, and have practiced with fenders, side, covers, number plates, seat humps, etc. But this is the first time I did an entire tank and all the metal work myself in-house. Last year I had a mentor coming in regularly and helping me learn this art form. He was an incredibly knowledgeable man, but passed away unexpectedly nearly a year ago. I learned more the month or so he was stopping by than I’ve absorbed in years. It took the wind out of my sails for a few months when that happened, but what I learned from him no one can take from me and finishing up this bike is a personal achievement.

The Build
We built the (all aluminum) subframe, tank, seat hump, seat pan, fly screen, front fender, radiator reservoir cover, and belly pan. We ditched the stock handlebars for a set of Vortex clip-ons. Relocated the speedometer with a custom-made bracket, and fabricated some brackets and mounted up a traditional headlight bucket that houses a Denali Electronics M7 DOT LED headlight. The exhaust is a set of stock headers, but we fabricated the tail pipe after the 2-into-1 joint and are now sending the stainless steel exhaust out of a big-mouth Cone Engineering muffler.

ktm superduke
Left: Aluminum all around: subframe, tank, seat hump, seat pan, fly screen, front fender, radiator reservoir cover, and belly pan. Middle: The exhaust is a set of stock headers, but we fabricated the tail pipe after the 2-into-1 joint and are now sending the stainless steel exhaust out of a big-mouth Cone Engineering muffler. Right: Airflow matters.Analog Motorcycles

We also installed a Moto Hooligan intake kit to open up the breathing. I had one on my SD and it helps wake the machine up a little more. We used some of our mini bolt LED rear signals and are prototyping out a slightly larger red version we may offer in the future. Mblaze discs for bar end signals up front and Renard Speed Shop switch gear that we import for the US market. They allow bikes with fuel pumps to get sleek aftermarket controls without rewiring the entire bike. We rewired a lot of the bike to slim down the harness and hide lots of modern-day electrical stuff. The clutch and brake duties are upgraded to Magura HC1 radial pumps.

ktm superduke
Top Left: Color and aesthetics are just as important as the mechanicals to Prust. Top Right: "I like color combos and making them tie an entire bike together, but I also wanted to show off the handmade aluminum work, so we sanded some strategically placed panels that we just clear coated over." —Tony Prust * Bottom Right: The rear should look as good as the front of the bike. Bottom Left: "We ditched the stock handlebars for a set of Vortex clip-ons. Relocated the speedometer with a custom-made bracket, and fabricated some brackets and mounted up a traditional headlight bucket that houses a Denali Electronics M7 DOT LED headlight." *—Tony PrustAnalog Motorcycles

We stripped the rims and hand sanded a section to go along with the paint scheme I had in mind for the tank and seat hump. I like color combos and making them tie an entire bike together, but I also wanted to show off the handmade aluminum work, so we sanded some strategically placed panels that we just clear coated over. Since it was a KTM I had to show a little orange love and asked Jason at Artistimo to lay down the gray and orange paint scheme. The whole bike was stripped down and sent out for powdercoating. Seat upholstery was done by Dane at Please Be Seated and is a perforated leather/gripper vinyl combo.

Analog Ducati Cucciolo
Four years in the making. The Analog Ducati Cucciolo.Grant Schwingle

Analog Ducati Cucciolo • 1950 Ducati Cucciolo

Owner: Del Thomas

Del has been a customer of Analog since 2013. He contacted us about building him a custom out of a rare-but-hated 1987 Ducati Indiana. We took the job on and created "Indy SS." He had some ideas about that build and we were able to help steer it into what ended up being the final product. He fell in love with that one and shortly after commissioned us to build him a 1975 Ducati 860 GT, but into a scrambler if Ducati would have made its Scrambler out of the twin engines back in the '70s.

Of course, we took that job on as well and again he had some ideas and we took the ball and rolled with it into what has been built and called the "Super Scrambler." Del has a bit of an obsession with Ducatis, and why not? It's a great make that has been around for some time. Del also owns a 1968 Scrambler 350 wide case, a 1990 851 with some go-fast goodies, and a 2009 Hyper 1100S. He pretty much has a model from every decade with exception to the '50s. Obviously, that needed to change.

Ducati Cucciolo Matto Seat
“The leather bag behind the seat post is where the small 12-volt (total loss) battery sits to power the lighting.” —Tony PrustGrant Schwingle

Over the course of our friendship Del has commandeered a few Cucciolo engines in his quest to complete the six decades of Ducatis. He had given thought to finding all the parts and putting one together himself. He found a pre-war ’30s Iver Johnson Bicycle frame and a modern motorized bike front fork setup. He also located a cool vintage Ideale leather seat and had a little mockup going of a Ducati Cucciolo boardtrack-style bike.

Life got in the way and he dropped off the project at our shop a couple years ago. It was merely a half mocked-up project, but Del asked if we would help with a couple things, but no rush. It sat in the shop and everyone who walked through the doors would stop and look at the little Cucciolo that someday might grow up and be a finished project.

One day I went ahead and put the Cucciolo on the rack and the creative wheels started turning. Del lives in Michigan but occasionally comes to the Chicago area for work. A year ago he walked in and saw the Cucciolo on the rack and I think his eyes actually lit up. Not sure if it was disbelief or excitement, but either way it was time to make this little puppy a reality.

The original design aesthetic was something along the lines of “El Matador.” Vintage look with natural metals and patina. Del’s mocked-up cardboard tank became stainless steel. The frame was cool, but once stripped hadn’t aged very well, so we fixed some stuff on it and decided it probably wouldn’t look good in just metal even with repairs. If we painted the frame black the rest of the patina and metal would just look average.

So like the previous projects we did for Del, we made a suggestion on a color to use, which was King Fisher Blue from the ’60s Ducati Monza. It would give a little nod to Ducati’s heritage and match well with metal, brass, and leather. The remaining updates were focused on making the bike look cool and functional. We made the bearing spacers for the shaft and modified a crankset so the engine would work on the frame. We had to add a little bit of spacers and attach it to the frame to get the engine to sit right. We made the tank and added bungs for mounting on the bottom as well as mounting some decorative leather straps on top.

Ducati Cucciolo Matto Bars
"The lever setup was a bit much on the original, so we streamlined it. It has a twist throttle now, clutch with tailored lever, dual pull brake with tailored lever that actuates both brakes together and a decompression kill lever on left thumb." —Tony PrustGrant Schwingle

The hand shifter was an option on the old machines, so we custom-made a hand shifter setup with all the linkage needed to work and decided to route all the cabling through the mounts as well as keeping everything nice and tidy. We added a taillight and a Denali Electronics DM Micro headlight because, why not? The leather bag behind the seat post is where the small 12-volt (total loss) battery sits to power the lighting. The lever setup was a bit much on the original, so we streamlined it. It has a twist throttle now, clutch with tailored lever, dual pull brake with tailored lever that actuates both brakes together and a decompression kill lever on left thumb. The throttle is a Biltwell Whiskey throttle and the rest is from Magura. We had Free Form Designs CNC us some brass pedal pieces to replace the aluminum parts on a pair of pedals we found.

Ducati Cucciolo Matto Drivetrain
"We had Free Form Designs CNC us some brass pedal pieces to replace the aluminum parts on a pair of pedals we found." —Tony PrustGrant Schwingle

All the cables are custom made in-house to fit just right. Leather work was again done by Dane Utech of Please Be Seated. Lots of brass, aluminum, and stainless steel accents were added. After the tank was sanded down and brush finished we had Jason at Artisimo clear coat it and paint a version of the original Little Puppy Cucciolo logo on the tank with matching blue and gold striping. As well as a little stainless steel number plate, we fabbed up the number “50” on it for the use of the 1950 Ducati Cucciolo engine.

Ducati Cucciolo Matto Tailpipe
A fine marriage of bicycle and early motorcycle technology.Grant Schwingle

Del now has six decades of Ducati in his collection. Some custom and some stock but all are loved, ridden, and enjoyed. We’re glad to have started this journey with him four years ago. Now that this collection is complete we’re curious to see what his next passion will be. Hopefully we can work with him some on creating more cool customs.

ducati
Want to see the bike in full? Attend the 2018 Quail Motorcycle Gathering on May 5.Analog Motorcycles

Analog Ducati Moto3 • 1968 Ducati 250

Owner: Tony Prust (for sale)

It’s a Moto3 prototype chassis. Was designed for modern liquid-cooled 250cc dirt bike engines. Has a bi-metal chassis made with chrome-moly steel tubing and billet aluminum connection points. Chassis was developed by Frame Crafters in Union, Illinois, which we modified to house a 1968 Ducati 250 narrow case engine. We rebuilt and converted the engine to a 12-volt system with electronic ignition. Also built an exhaust and tuned Dell’Orto VHB27A carbs. We made a tank, tailsection, fairing, and fender out of aluminum. Beringer brakes all the way around. Re-wired with a new MotoGadget m.unit blue.

Analog Ducati Moto3
We’ll have more images of the new Analog Ducati Moto3 bike next week.Analog Motorcycles

It looks like a racebike standing still, but with an old, beautiful Ducati bevel-head engine. Street legal for maximum pleasure.

See these bikes and more at The Quail Motorcycle Gathering this Saturday, May 5.